#Motivational & #Inspirational Wednesday! #RRBC


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WINNER OF THE MOST INSPIRATIONAL AND UPLIFTING COMMENT:

SUZANNE BURKE!!!

Suzanne has won a #PUSHTUESDAY slot and a FREE book of choice from the Kathryn C. Treat Treasure Chest!

Everyone goes through storms at times.  The rich, the poor, the powerful, the President;  doesn’t matter what or who you are, you are not immune to the struggles and trials of life.  During this time of storm, what’s needed is support and encouragement from everyone around.  Truth be told, some even find it hard to get out of bed and get dressed, and it’s at those times, when motivational words help to lift them right up.

Today is our Motivational & Inspirational Wednesday and we want all of you to help us lift someone up!  But, today it’s more than just leaving an inspirational comment.  Today, we want you to share with us how you handle a specific situation, because maybe, we’re not handling it as well as we could or even should be.

TODAY’S TOPIC:  PANHANDLING

Panhandling has reached almost epidemic status.  You can’t take three steps in my city without being accosted by someone who is asking for money,  and, Walmart parking lots are the worst!  I personally believe that it has turned into big business, and the way some of these folks operate on the sides of the road, that’s exactly what it looks like.  You may not believe this, but I heard a recent tale of a man who was accepting donations by using one of those swipe-thingies on his phone!  That’s right, if you don’t have cash, I take credit cards, too! 

Some people truly need help and are hungry and homeless, but, like the one example above…you’re left to wonder.  (It’s folks like this who make it hard for those who really need help).

So, here is the question:  If you’re faced with panhandling in your neck of the woods, how do you handle it?  Do you walk right by and ignore them by pretending as if you don’t hear them?  Do you hold up traffic to hand them money out the window at stop lights?  Do you report them to the authorities?  What do you do?

After you tell us how you handle these situations, please, explain to us why you handle the situations in that way.

Remember, we want our community to get inspired and feel uplifted by simply reading the comments left by YOU.  This is our year of better, and maybe your take on a situation will help someone else to see it more clearly, and also cause them to think and grow from what you have shared.  The person who leaves the most inspiring and motivational words of wisdom in the comments section below, wins our SURPRISE OF THE WEEK!

You never know just how impactful your words are, until a life has changed because of them. – NJ

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36 responses

  1. Thank you so much. I’m delighted to have been selected, and as always hope that in some small way I have contributed to the understanding of the complexity of life on the streets.

    Like

  2. Wow, Sooz!! Phenomenal statements and just what I needed to hear. If I had it to give I would give to anyone who asked, unless it was obvious that they were panhandling or alcoholics. But even they have to eat sometime. What makes me furious is all the organizations which which ask for money, etc. for the poor and only give 10% to the needy, keeping the rest for themselves. The Red Cross is one, Wounded Warriors, and United Way, just to name a few. The Salvation Army is best and St Jude’s Hospital for kids. I sometimes chance ‘Feed the Children’ in Oklahoma for Indian children on reservations. I give to my church but often wonder why they cannot spend less on fancy, expensive statues, robes and other expensive adornments and give that money directly to staring children. We can’t trust sending packages of food and clothing to starving African Nations because half the time they are warring and the goods are given to the armies while the little ones starve. So it is real problem when you want to give but have no promise that what you give goes to the needy ones. I cannot bear to see children starving and unclothed when most of us could afford a little to help.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Hello! These are hard times we’re living in and although there are always those who abuse the trust and kindness of others there are also those who desperately need our help. If I can give a little money to someone in need I’m going to do it. I’m not a sucker––I understand that some people are deceitful and are simply taking advantage, but I don’t care. It’s nearly impossible to know who needs the money and who doesn’t. I believe in karma. I don’t worry about whether or not I gave money to someone that didn’t need it. I will be judged according to my deeds and those people will be judged according to theirs. 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  4. […] https://ravereviewsbynonniejules.wordpress.com/2017/05/31/motivational-inspirational-wednesday-rrbc/ How do you handle panhandling? I’ve lived at a poverty level for the last nine years. It’s what keeps me from Indie publishing at the moment. I have two children and am a single parent. Both my children are now of age. Although finances will begin to improve shortly, I risk losing my insurance in the future due to that. I’m on disability and have pre-existing conditions. When I need help, I go to organizations. I do help when I can but as said, I donate to organizations not individuals unless I personally know them. […]

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I worry where the money is truly going…drugs? alcohol? I ask God for guidance on when and how much I should give. I believe most homeless shelters, food banks, and churches are the best course. It is too bad that we even have to question where our giving is being used.
    Thank you for bringing up this question for discussion, Nonnie.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I always used to give, if I could, when I saw someone in need, directly. Our small area has a large homeless population, that got moved here from another area. I have taken a different approach than I used to, when I saw panhandling was being taken advantage of…Now, I support our local homeless shelter. My daughter worked there for a while. I got to know the needs of our homeless community, and their stories. When I am not sure what to do, I ask how to help. They always have an answer. I give to many charities, including our food bank. I help out the Churches when they put out a need. We used to donate items for the homeless during the winter, with individual bags of personal items. There is a person who leaves scarves,hats, gloves, backpacks, snacks and money throughout the town in the winter, for those who need it. I am inspired by all these organizations. I am not as direct as I used to be, but I will always follow what my heart tells me at the any given moment, too. I know I am lucky and blessed in my life and all I can do is share that with others who aren’t. I realize how easily it could be me in their shoes, and that is how I approach it.

    Thank you for bringing up this subject. There is so much kindness in this world, too.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. My church has a food ministry, so mostly I just do my part to keep that going. But if I see someone in the pouring rain, I try to give them 5 bucks so they can go get some coffee or something. It’s hard to know what to do sometimes.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. My Thoughts on #Panhandling.

    This is difficult to write. Why? Because my thoughts and responses come from a woman that survived on the streets of Sydney, Australia; for five years. Namely, me. I don’t recommend it, folks. At any age, it is hellishly difficult, but at the age of eleven, it is a terrifying, and often soul-destroying experience, that is of course if you still had a soul when you got there.
    In response to the question of WHAT I do. How do I deal with the Panhandlers?
    Would I hand over money? NO, I would not.
    Harsh? No, I don’t believe so.
    WHY?
    I know what it is like to be always afraid. I remember the hunger that had me eating from trashcans, and being grateful to find some half-rotted fruit.
    I know the look of despair in the eyes of most street people, for I have gazed into a mirror and seen them reflected back.
    I have known the pushers, the pimps, and the criminals that prey like hyena on the flesh of the weak. I have watched junkies shoot up, and I have watched a few die.
    I have seen people using their own children to beg, wise in the acceptance that a child would earn them more money, to sustain their drug habit.
    I’ve watched good cops turn away, overwhelmed by the enormity of a crime against humanity that sees children battered and bartered away.
    I have seen the helpless, the hopeless and those that would die.
    BUT, handing out coins to a few selected from many, will maybe make you feel better about yourself, and if a salve for your desensitized conscience is all that you need then go ahead, do it. BUT WHOM DO YOU PICK?
    The dirty child or the old woman? The veteran, the disabled, or the old guy with the dog? WHO? Would you know from experience that this person would not use those coins to buy alcohol or drugs?
    I believe NONE of us should attempt to make that choice.
    Because there are others that DO recognize these folks, they give their lives over 24/7 utterly dedicated to helping those that need helping.
    They know the difference between a junky and a pimp. They learn the street peoples street names. They know where they sleep; they have seen where they die.
    They know that they will lose many to save just a few.
    These folks belong to churches, charities and all the good folks in between, they are nurses and doctors, mothers and fathers, they run the soup kitchens and shelters, they know where to find the youngest ones, the infirm and the old.
    THAT is where I donate my coins. Whatever I can spare goes to the Salvation Army. In winter, I donate a sleeping bag, and a blanket. They will make good use of it.
    They will already be aware of the street folks who would barter away their new treasures for one hit of ‘crack’.
    I understand the enormity of this plague of the helpless.
    However, I would rather knowingly have folks that know what to look for take my donation and perhaps help just one, than potentially hand it someone better able to help themselves.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Soooz, all I can say is WOW! #Powerful

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks, Nonnie. I hope that this may somehow assist the good folks out there that find themselves torn about what to do in this situation.

        Like

    2. Thanks for sharing this, Soooz.

      Liked by 1 person

    3. Shirley Harris-Slaughter | Reply

      Soooz, yours is a very good take on the problem, taken from your own terrible experience. My organization and I volunteer at the Capuchin Kitchen once a month and serve food; we pack food at Forgotten Harvest, so doing my part to help out. Seeing it from your perspective helps me to see the usefulness of giving my time in this way, and I appreciate your wisdom.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thank you so much, Shirley. Never doubt that your time is valued, my friend. Its folks like yourself that help restore hope to the hopeless. It is appreciated.

        Liked by 1 person

    4. Wow, thank you for sharing this and your experience. It gave me a lot to think about. I agree about support those great organizations.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I am happy to share my insights, especially if I am able to cause folks to perhaps think about this topic more deeply. There never will be any easy answers. 🌹

        Liked by 2 people

    5. Thanks for sharing, Soooz 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. 🌹Hi, Laura, I’m glad to have been given the opportunity to express something that I feel very deeply about.

        Liked by 1 person

    6. Wow Sooz, I’m in awe of your strength of spirit. You get my vote!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. 🌹 Hi, Wendy! I’m smiling here. I don’t know if its ‘strength of spirit’ as much as it’s industrial strength pig-headed-obstinance, my friend.😊

        Liked by 1 person

    7. Every time I read something about you or from you, I am amazed at your strength of character, your responses to your life experiences, and how well you articulate it all. I vote for you, my friend who has so summarized what I am sure many of us feel.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. How kind you are. Karen. My writing comes from life knowledge, and I always hold my self open to the understanding that I have so very much more to learn. I so appreciate your words and your friendship. ❤️️

        Like

    8. Sooz, your personal insight into this subject is…well, there are no words. Simply astounding, powerful and brutally honest. You are such an inspiration. Hugs across the world!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ❤️️ Thank you so much, Jan. I hope that I have perhaps helped folks to understand just a little better. It will never be any less than a painful and difficult thing for good people to witness.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. This morning I accompanied my 91-year-old mom to church. The reading was from John 17 and the phrase that captured my attention was: “so that they may be one, as we are one, I in them and you in me.” When I’m around panhandlers, I acknowledge them and if I feel moved to do so, I help them financially. I listen intently to my own heart and respond accordingly. For all that I know, the beggar might be someone who helps me across the street when I’m my mom’s age. 😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oh, how true, Gwen. Another beautiful view. Hugs!

      Like

  10. I apologise for being a day late, but this is such an important question and there certainly is no straightforward answer. I try to assess each situation now, whereas before, things used to just crack me up and I’ll take out some money – until I saw a chap going into the wine cellars, coming out with a bulging bag of booze and just that morning, he had two of his little children stand with him at the traffic lights between the dual lines – such a dangerous place for small kids and in the blistering heat too – and I gave him all my cash. I learned a valuable lesson that morning – the need for discretion. I have and will continue to encourage giving money to elderly folks who are neatly dressed and stand at the traffic light, hoping to get a few coins. There are folks out there whose so-called ‘Old Age Grants’ barely cover their very modest accommodation, let alone buy basic foodstuffs and these are the decent people who for reasons only known to themselves, have to take to the street to make ends meet.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh, Maretha! I don’t know what I would have done. I would have been tempted to turn him over my knee. 🙂 But, then I’d be in trouble. Poor kiddos. Some of them have no chance in life. It breaks my heart. The children and the elderly are sometimes victims of circumstances beyond their control.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Shirley Harris-Slaughter | Reply

    I see panhandlers in the city and in the rich suburbs and its very sad. There are times when I am moved to hand out a dollar or two and then if the spirit doesn’t move me I will ignore them. I pay close attention to a particular panhandler who occupies the same territory all the time. It looks like someone lives there because of junk that is left when he’s not around. I have been tempted to report him but hesitate to do so. It really pains me to see so many of them in various sections of the region. The ones that get me the most are the veterans (if they are truly what they say they are) because they served our country and this should not be happening to them. There should be programs in place when they leave their tour of duty and if there aren’t any, then something needs to be done to address it. Seeing these people make me thankful that I have a roof over my head and food to eat, because it didn’t have to be this way. I thank God and I pray for everyone else who is not as fortunate. I think talking about it is the first step towards finding a solution. Let’s keep the conversation going. Thank you NJ for bringing this to our attention.

    You are the best!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree, Shirley. The Veterans really get to me (if, as you say, they really are Veterans). Well-said.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Shirley Harris-Slaughter | Reply

        And, Jan, I am also inclined to believe that vets are guided in the right direction when they leave service. I’m going to check into it a little bit and see what I can find out.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. In Australia those vets on the streets are the ones who have fallen between the cracks in an underfunded system. They have served, and they have returned, some of them forever damaged by what they have witnessed. No hospital can hold them when they seek out the isolation of the streets. They don’t mix with the other street people, they seek out the darkest of corners in which to hide. Those that are visible are no less damaged, they are simply the ones who have made the choice to re-connect on any level they can.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Gracie Bradford | Reply

            Well stated Soooz.
            The same occurs in the states. There are many programs available for veterans when they leave the military. People need to understand that there are a few veterans who choose to be homeless and away from people. Even if you offer housing, they are more comfortable under the bridges around what they perceive as “true” friends who understand them.

            I have had experience with panhandles in many cities and have learned to distinguish those who are in need versus those who are just trying to make a “free” bucks. I hate to see parents putting their kids on street corners begging for money. It breaks my heart. On the other hand, when I see a sign that say “give me 25 cents for a beer”, I laugh and give them the quarter because they are being honest.

            Tip 1: Offer food. If they refuse and say they need money, pray for them. The money is usually for other reasons that you don’t want your hard earn money supporting.
            Tip 2: Look at the clothing and grooming.
            Tip 3: Give what they ask for and don’t question if they are legit or not. For freely we give to freely receive.

            This is a topic that I have to pray on every time I see someone at the corner. Sometimes, I find myself rolling up my car window or just looking the other way because I have had bad experiences with the giving. My pastor taught me not to judge but to give to those less fortunate than I. It is not easy when you see some of the things I have seen over the years.

            Liked by 1 person

  12. As always, Nonnie Jules does not shy away from difficult topics. It makes us think. I respond differently to different situations. For instance, in New Orleans, children are on the street doing a tap dance for a donation and I almost always give them something. However, the last time I was there, a little kid followed me down the street demanding that I give him more than a dollar. That may be the last time I give to the kids. Rude behavior or belligerent demanding will result in NO gift from me. And, the other thing I do is listen to my gut. When I look in a person’s eyes, I like to believe I am seeing beyond the exterior. If my gut grips me and I feel emotion, I will most likely give money. That’s my two cents worth. And, I agree, that for some it has become a business and they may possibly be raking more in a day than we make. Again, that’s where I listen to my inner voice. Thanks for the thought-provoking topic, Nonnie.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I know exactly what you mean. I had a kid accost me at my car as I was trying to put my two small shopping bags on the back seat. I said to him that I didn’t have any cash on me, which was the truth in this particular INCIDENT, but still, did I even need to explain my financial situation to a kid on the street? He got very angry and called me all sorts of racists’ names and called me a liar, bashing my car door against me and kicking the tyre.
      I turned around and said, ‘You should be in school, not on the street. I’ve just finished my lessons, so if you want me to help you, attend school and if you don’t, then please leave before I call the police.’ Needless to say, he gave me another mouth full, but left when a tall chap approached us to find out what was going on.
      Generally though, I do try to help children, especially when they’re at the beaches, I’ll offer to buy them fresh water and a hamburger, but not many want that, they only want the money.

      Liked by 2 people

  13. ‘this is our year of better”…i love that Nonnie! days turns to weeks to months & into a year…& then…an open road & future filled with better everythings! babystepping thru the year with these weekly thought & feeling provokers is a beautiful idea & gift of help to move thru it with! the nyc subways are chock full of sad stories & desperate people needing assistance….& they run the gamut in terms of age, color, creed, etc, as well as the ways & the hows they are searching for help. Sometimes, on a not so great day for me, seeing that struggle can be enough to overwhelm. On a good day, still, sadness in my heart. No matter the what, the who, the how they are looking for help, what their “story” seems to be, & whether or not on that particular day & in that specific moment I can offer up something to them, I always always try my best not to judge what I am seeing & hearing. I have no idea what any of their back stories may be, & the pains they have experienced. And as our paths cross, instead of wondering wtf, or shaming them in my head…I say a prayer that God guide & bless them on their journey & that they get the assistance they need, however & whatever form that takes. Prayer is a powerful thing. And, I always thank God, for my own life, & my own good fortune. TU Nonnie, as I get set to head out this morning onto that subway. I needed to read that post today. Im so grateful for the reminder.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for sharing, Tia!

      Like

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